Archive for the ‘Wine’ Category

Drinking where Hercules killed the lion

April 5th, 2017

Don’t expect Greek table wines to stand up to those from the likes of Italy and France. It is infamous for bland ones.

Many will seem watery. That’s historically reasonable too. Think of a symposium, which is Greek for drinking together. In ancient times, the likes of Socrates would resolve matters philosophical, governmental and more over wine. However, a big however, they watered their wine equally or more; they wanted to keep a clear head for the discussions.

Over my life, I’ve had decent Greek wines. Moreover my wife and I are fond of retsina. I’ve heard many compare the resin-tinged wine to the way kerosene smells. Then in disclosure note that I love malt whiskey, particularly those from Islay. My absolute favorite is the very peaty Lagavulin. Even some Scotch fans say it reminds them of iodine.

On our recent swing through Greece, we found a nice white from Corfu and a new favorite brand of retsina. We also tasted two whites and three reds at Domaine Skouras  in Nemea, near Corinth. Those included some real winners.


Dimitris at Skouras really knows his horticulture. Nearly as important he is a great showman. He made the tour and tasting funny and fun.
We did two dry whites — a 100% Moscofilero and the Armyra, 95% Chafrdonnay and 5% Malagousia. The former was flowery and the latter fruity. Either would would be a fine patio buddy. They were respectively just under 8 € and just under 10 €. Things are cheap in Greece, but these would be well worth more.
Of our 3 reds, two featured the classic Nemean Saint George (Agiorgitiko) grape. Saint George was 100% and Megas Oenos (snicker, big wine) 80% with 20% Cabernet Sauvignon. Fleva was 100% Syrah. The 17.4 € Megas allegedly would cellar well for 15 years. The 14 € Fleva had complex nose and mouth. I liked the 8.8 € Saint George best, medium body with long finish.
Back in the bleachers, we discovered a new favorite retsina at several restaurants on Corfu and in Athens. Malamatina is full flavored and not too heavy on the resin. It is an excellent meal wine.

Pix Notes: You’re welcome to anything useful. They are Creative Commons, so just cite Mike Ball once. Click images to enlarge.